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Social Studies

Students in historical costumes

Kindergarten

1. Civics & Government 

K.1 Explain why rules reduce conflict and promote fairness.
K.2 Use and identify respectful dialogue, taking turns, and explain how rules are different in
different settings.
K.3 Describe roles of self and family members.

 

2. Economics 

K.4 Distinguish between personal wants and needs.

3. Multicultural Studies 

K.2 Use and identify respectful dialogue, taking turns, and explain how rules are different in
different settings. (Civics)
K.7 Identify examples of ownership of different items, recognizing the difference between private
and public ownership, the responsibility for stewardship and guardianship, and the opportunity
for sharing. (Economics)
K.10 Locate, identify, and describe places of importance to self, family, school, and culture.
(Geography)
K.14 Identify “change-makers,” those that change things that are not fair and those that make the
world better.
K.17 Make connections (similarities and differences) between self and others. (History)

 

4. Financial Literacy 

K.5 Identify forms of US money and explain how money is used.
K.6 Give examples of different jobs performed in communities.
K.7 Identify examples of ownership of different items, recognizing the difference between private
and public ownership, the responsibility for stewardship and guardianship, and the opportunity
for borrowing and sharing.
K.8 Explain how people earn income and that some jobs earn money while some are volunteer.

 

5. Geography

K.9 Identify, compare, and contrast pictures, maps and globes.
K.10 Locate, identify, and describe places of importance to self, family, school, and culture.
K.11 Explain how people can care for our environment (such as classroom, playground, library, etc.).
K.12 Use terms related to location, direction, and distance (such as over/under, here/there, left/right, above/below, forward/backward, between).

 

6. Historical Knowledge/Thinking 

K.13 Understand that events happen in a sequential order.
K.14 Identify “change-makers,” those that change things that are not fair and those that make the world better.
K.15 Distinguish between past and present.
K.16 Understand and create timelines to show basic personal events in a sequential order
K.17 Make connections (similarities and differences) between self and others.
K.18 Compare and contrast past and present events or practices.

 

7. Social Science Analysis

K.19 For a given problem find a solution that demonstrates fairness and empathy.
K.20 Given context clues, develop a reasonable idea about who created the primary or secondary source, when they created it, where they created it, or why they created it.

1st Grade

1. Civics & Government 

1.1 Describe the responsibilities of leaders and team members and demonstrate the ability to be
both when working to accomplish a common task.
1.2 Apply civic virtues (such as equality, freedom, liberty, respect for individual rights, equity, justice, and deliberation) when participating in school settings (such as the classroom, cafeteria, playground, assemblies, and independent work).

 

2. Economics 

1.3 Identify sources of income (some examples could be gifts, borrowing, allowance, work wages, government assistance).
1.4 Compare and contrast the monetary value of items. (Some things cost more than others do.)

 

3. Multicultural Studies 

1.2 Apply civic virtues (such as equality, freedom, liberty, respect for individual rights, equity, justice, and deliberation) when participating in school settings (such as the classroom, cafeteria, playground, assemblies, and independent work).
1.6 Describe ways people celebrate their diverse cultural heritages in the community. (Geography)
1.7 Locate and identify important places in the community (school, library, fire department,
cultural places). (Geography)
1.13 Understand, affirm, respect, and celebrate the diversity of individuals, families, and school
communities. (History)1.14 Make connections between the student’s family and other families, the student’s school and
other schools. (History)
1.14 Make connections between the student’s family and other families, the student’s school and other schools. (History)

 

4. Financial Literacy 

1.5 Identify different uses of money (saving, spending and sharing/contributing)

5. Geography 

1.6 Describe ways people celebrate their diverse cultural heritages in the community.
1.7 Locate and identify important places in the community (school, library, fire department,
cultural places, etc.).
1.8 Explain how seasonal changes influence activities in school and community
1.9 Give examples of local natural resources and describe how people use them.
1.10 Construct maps (including mental maps), graphs, and other representations of familiar places

 

6. Historical Knowledge/Thinking

1.11 Understand that families have a past.
1.12 Identify songs and symbols commonly associated with the United States of America.
1.13 Understand, affirm, respect, and celebrate the diversity of individuals, families, and school
communities.
1.14 Make connections between the student’s family and other families, the student’s school and
other schools
1.15 Use terms related to time to place events that have occurred in sequential order
1.16 Develop and analyze a simple timeline of important family events in a sequential order.
1.17 Explain the use of different kinds of historical sources to study the past.
1.18 Generate questions about a particular historical source (such as photo, letter, or document) as
it relates to a family’s history.

 

7. Social Science Analysis

1.19 Identify cause-and-effect relationships.
1.20 Identify and explain a range of issues and problems and some ways that people are addressing
them.
1.21 Identify ways that students can take informed action to help address issues and problems.
1.22 Determine if a source is primary or secondary and distinguish whether it is mostly fact or
opinion.

2nd Grade

1. Civics & Government 

2.1 Compare personal point of view with others’ perspectives when participating in rule setting.
2.2 Identify services provided by city government.
2.3 Evaluate how individuals, groups, and communities manage conflict and promote justice and
equity.
2.4 Give examples of and identify appropriate and inappropriate use of power and its effect.
2.5 Identify city leaders and their functions.
2.6 Analyze the different ways students can have an effect on their local community.

 

2. Economics 

2.7 Identify local businesses and the goods and services they produce.
2.8 Describe the role of banks in an economy

 

3. Multicultural Studies 

2.1 Compare personal point of view with others’ perspectives when participating in rule
setting.(Civics)
2.3 Evaluate how individuals, groups, and communities manage conflict and promote justice and
equity. (Civics)
2.4 Give examples of and identify appropriate and inappropriate use of power and its effect.
(Civics)
2.10 Explain how wealth and scarcity connect to decision-making about personal savings and
spending. (Financial Literacy)
2.13 Identify cultural characteristics of the community. (Geography)
2.16 Identify a variety of diverse individuals, groups, and circumstances that had an impact on the
local community including individuals who are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian
or Americans of African, Asian, Pacific Island, Chicano, Latino, or Middle Eastern descent;
individuals from all religious backgrounds; and individuals from traditionally marginalized
groups (women, people with disabilities, immigrants, refugees, and individuals who are lesbian,
gay, bisexual, or transgender). (History)
2.17 Identify and describe community celebrations, landmarks, symbols and traditions and explain why they are significant to the cultural heritage of members of the community. (History)

 

4. Financial Literacy 

2.9 Explain various methods of saving and how saving can help reach both short and long-term
financial goals.
2.10 Explain how wealth and scarcity connect to decision making about personal savings and
spending.

 

5. Geography 

2.11 Use basic information on maps and other geographic tools to locate, identify and describe
physical and human features of the community.
2.12 Identify relative location of school and community in the state and nation and the world.
2.13 Identify cultural characteristics of the community.
2.14 Use and apply cardinal directions to locate and identify features on maps (such as oceans,
cities, continents).
2.15 Use a simple grid system, symbols, and other information to locate the physical and political
features of places on maps and globes.

 

6. Historical Knowledge/Thinking

2.16 Identify a variety of diverse individuals, groups, and circumstances that had an impact on the local community including individuals who are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian or Americans of African, Asian, Pacific Island, Chicano, Latino, or Middle Eastern descent; individuals from all religious backgrounds; and individuals from traditionally marginalized groups (women, people with disabilities, immigrants, refugees, and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender). (History)
2.17 Identify and describe community celebrations, landmarks, symbols and traditions, and explain
why they are significant to the cultural heritage of members of the community.
2.18 Differentiate between events that happened in the recent and distant past
2.19 Develop and analyze a timeline of events in the history of the local community.
2.20 Generate questions using a historical source as it relates to the local community’s history
2.21 Explain how people and events of the past influence the present.
2.22 Understand that cause and effect relationships help recount events, and understand the events
that led to the development of the community.

 

7. Social Science Analysis

2.23 Describe the connection between two or more current or historical events.
2.24 Compare and contrast past and present situations, people, and events in neighborhoods and communities.
2.25 Evaluate information relating to an issue or problem.
2.26 Use listening, consensus-building, and voting procedures to decide on and take informed
action.

3rd Grade

1. Civics & Government  

3.1 Examine how different levels of city and county government provide services to members of a community.
3.2 Describe the responsibilities of people in their community and state.
3.3 Explain how a community relies on active civic participation and identify opportunities for
student participation in local and regional issues.

 

2. Economics 

3.4 Describe the relationship between producers and consumers.
3.5 Explain how profit influences sellers in markets.
3.6 Identify key industries of Oregon.

 

3. Multicultural Studies 

3.3 Explain how a community relies on active civic participation and identify opportunities for student participation in local issues. (Civics)
3.9 Describe and compare human characteristics of regions in Oregon (tribal, cultural, agricultural, industrial, etc.) (Geography)
3.11 Describe how individuals, groups, (e.g. socioeconomic differences, ethnic groups, and social groups including individuals who are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian or Americans of African, Asian, Pacific Island, Chicano, Latino, or Middle Eastern descent), religious groups, and other traditionally marginalized groups (women, people with disabilities, immigrants, refugees, and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender), events and developments have shaped the local community and region.
3.14 Explain why individuals and groups (e.g. socioeconomic, ethnic, and religious groups, and traditionally marginalized groups) in the same historical period differed in the way they viewed and interpreted historical events. (History)

 

4. Financial Literacy 

3.7 Analyze the impact of personal financial decisions on personal, community, regional, and world resources. (i.e. how my individual financial actions have an impact on myself/others/resources)

5. Geography 

3.8 Use geographical tools (maps, satellite images, photographs, Google Earth, and other representations) to identify multiple ways to divide Oregon into areas (such as tribal, river systems, interstate highways, county, physical, industry, agricultural).
3.9 Describe and compare physical and human characteristics of regions in Oregon (tribal, cultural, agricultural, industrial, etc.).
3.10 Identify and analyze Oregon’s natural resources and describe how people in Oregon and other parts of the world use them.

 

6. Historical Knowledge/Thinking

3.11 Describe how individuals, groups, (e.g. socioeconomic differences, ethnic groups, and social groups including individuals who are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian or Americans of African, Asian, Pacific Island, Chicano, Latino, or Middle Eastern descent) and SBE May 17, 2018 8 of 26 These standards were adopted by the Oregon State Board of Education on May 17, 2018. Schools and districts should align instruction to these standards. religious groups, and other traditionally marginalized groups (women, people with disabilities, immigrants, refugees, and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender), events and developments have shaped the communities and regions
3.12 Compare and contrast the history of the local community to other communities in a region.
3.13 Apply research skills and technologies to gather information about the past in a region.
3.14 Explain why individuals and groups (e.g. socioeconomic, ethnic, and religious groups, and other traditionally marginalized groups) in the same historical period differed in the way they viewed and interpreted historical events
3.15 Explain how sources serve different purposes for answering historical questions.
3.16 Generate questions using multiple historical sources and examine their validity.

 

7. Social Science Analysis

3.17 Use a variety of historical sources including artifacts, pictures and documents to identify factual evidence.
3.18 Identify and compare different ways of looking at an event, issue, or problem with an emphasis on multiple perspectives.
3.19 Analyze different ways that people, other living things, and the environment might be affected by an event, issue, or problem.

 

4th Grade

1. Civics & Government

4.1 Investigate the organization and functions of Oregon government.
4.2 Explain how Oregon achieved statehood and identify the stakeholders involved.

 

2. Economics 

4.3 Analyze how wealth and scarcity connect to personal, community, regional, and world
resources.

3. Multicultural Studies 

4.2 Explain how Oregon achieved statehood and identify the stakeholders involved. (Civics)
4.3 Analyze how wealth and scarcity connect to personal, community, regional, and world
resources. (Economics)
4.7 Explain the interactions between the Pacific Northwest physical systems and human systems,
with a focus on Native Americans in that region. (Geography)
4.11 Analyze the distinct way of knowing and living amongst the different American Indian tribes in Oregon prior to colonization, such as religion, language, and cultural practices and the subsequent impact of that colonization. (History)
4.12 Explain how diverse individuals, groups (including socioeconomic differences, ethnic groups,
and social groups and including individuals who are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native
Hawaiian or Americans of African, Asian, Pacific Island, Chicano, Latino, or Middle Eastern
descent, religious groups), and other traditionally marginalized groups (women, people with
disabilities, immigrants, refugees, and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or
transgender), circumstances and events influenced the early growth and changes in Oregon
(including, but not limited to fur trappers, traders, Lewis and Clark, pioneers and westward
movement).(History)
4.13 Give examples of changes in Oregon’s agricultural, industrial, political, and business development over time, and the impacts on the people of the state (including people of different socioeconomic status, ethnic groups, religious groups, and other traditionally marginalized groups). (History)
4.14 Examine the history of the nine federally recognized Oregon tribes. (History)

 

4. Financial Literacy

4.4 Analyze different buying choices and opportunity costs.
4.5 Demonstrate understanding of needs and wants using a budget.
4.6 Determine the consequences of sharing personal information with others.

 

5. Geography 

4.7 Explain the interactions between the Pacific Northwest physical systems and human systems, with a focus on Native Americans in that region.
4.8 Compare and contrast varying patterns of settlements in Oregon, considering, past, present,
and future trends.
4.9 Identify conflicts involving use of land, natural resources, economic interests, competition for
scarce resources, different political views, boundary disputes, and cultural differences within
Oregon and between different geographical areas.
4.10 Describe how technological developments, societal decisions, and personal practices affect Oregon’s sustainability (dams, wind turbines, climate change and variability, transportation systems, etc.).

 

6. Historical Knowledge/Thinking 

4.11 Analyze the distinct way of knowing and living amongst the different American Indian tribes in Oregon prior to colonization, such as religion, language, and cultural practices and the
subsequent impact of that colonization.
4.12 Explain how diverse individuals, groups (including socioeconomic differences, ethnic groups, and social groups and including individuals who are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian or Americans of African, Asian, Pacific Island, Chicano, Latino, or Middle Eastern descent, religious groups), and other traditionally marginalized groups (women, people with disabilities, immigrants, refugees, and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender), circumstances and events influenced the early growth and changes in Oregon (including, but not limited to fur trappers, traders, Lewis and Clark, pioneers and westward movement).
4.13 Give examples of changes in Oregon’s agricultural, industrial, political, and business
development over time, and the impacts on the people of the state (including people of
different socioeconomic status, ethnic groups, religious groups, and other traditionally
marginalized groups).
4.14 Examine the history of the nine federally recognized Oregon tribes.
4.15 Distinguish between fact and fiction in historical accounts by comparing documentary sources
on historical figures and events with fictional characters and events in stories.
4.16 Create and evaluate timelines that show relationships among people, events, and movements
in Oregon history.
4.17 Use primary and secondary sources to explain events in Oregon history.
4.18 Infer the purpose of a primary source and from that the intended audience.

 

7. Social Science Analysis

4.19 Compare eyewitness and secondhand accounts of an event.
4.20 Construct explanations using reasoning, correct sequence, examples and details with relevant
information and data.
4.21 Analyze historical accounts related to Oregon to understand cause-and-effect
4.22 Determine the validity of multiple sources, both historical and current, including but not limited
to, diverse, primary and secondary sources.
4.23 Explain individual and cooperative approaches people have taken, or could take in the future,
to address local, regional, and global problems, as well as predict possible results of those
actions.

5th Grade

1. Civics & Government

5.1 Analyze how cooperation and conflict among people contribute to political, economic,
religious, and current social events and situations in the United States.
5.2 Summarize and critique how colonial and new states’ governments affected groups within their population (such as citizens, enslaved peoples, foreigners, nobles, religious groups, women,class systems, tribes).
5.3 Compare and contrast tribal forms of government, British monarchy, and early American colonial governments.
5.4 Identify principles of U.S. democracy found in the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights
5.5 Describe how national government affects local, state, and Oregon tribal governments.

2. Economics

5.6 Explain ways trade can be encouraged or restricted and how it affects relationships between
countries.
5.7 Explain the purpose of taxes and give examples of their use from current and U.S. history.

 

3. Multicultural Studies

5.1 Analyze how cooperation and conflict among people contribute to political, economic,
religious, and current social events and situations in the United States. (Civics)
5.2 Summarize and critique how colonial and new states’ governments affected groups within theirpopulation (such as citizens, enslaved peoples, foreigners, nobles, religious groups, women,
class systems, tribes). (Civics)
5.3 Compare and contrast tribal forms of government, British monarchy, and early American colonial governments. (Civics)
5.10 Compare and contrast movement of people, goods, ideas, and cultural patterns in the United States, considering past, present and future trends. (Geography)
5.13 Describe how natural and human-made events in one place affect people in other places.
(Geography)
5.14 Analyze the distinct way of knowing and living amongst the different American Indian tribes of
North America prior to contact in the late 15th and 16th centuries, such as religion, language,
and cultural practices and the subsequent impact of that contact. (History)
5.16 Explain the religious, political, and economic reasons for movement of people from Europe to the Americas, and analyze the multiple perspectives of the interactions between settlers and American Indians. (History)
5.19 Identify and examine the roles and impact of diverse groups of people (e.g. gender roles, social
roles, political and economic structures) within the 13 British colonies that became the United
States. including individuals who are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian or
Americans of African, Asian, Pacific Island, Chicano, Latino, or Middle Eastern descent, religious
groups, and other traditionally marginalized groups (women, people with disabilities,
immigrants, refugees, and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender).(History)
5.21 Identify issues related to historical events to recognize power, authority, and governance as it relates to systems of oppression and its impact on ethnic and religious groups and other traditionally marginalized groups in the modern era (bias and injustice, discrimination, stereotypes).
5.24 Explain why individuals and groups, including ethnic and religious groups, and traditionally
marginalized groups during the same historical period differed in their perspectives of events.
(History)

 

4. Financial Literacy 

5.8 Analyze career choices through the return on investment (qualifications, education, and
income potential).

5. Geography 

5.9 Use geographical tools (maps, satellite images, photographs, Google Earth, and other
representations) to investigate and compare how areas in the United States can be divided in
multiple ways.
5.10 Compare and contrast movement of people, goods, ideas, and cultural patterns in the United States, considering past, present and future trends.
5.11 Describe how physical, human and political features influence events, movements, and
adaptation to the environment.
5.12 Describe how technological developments, societal decisions, and personal practices affects
sustainability in the United States.
5.13 Describe how natural and human-made events in one place affect people in other places.

 

6. Historical Knowledge/Thinking 

5.14 Analyze the distinct way of knowing and living amongst the different American Indian tribes of North America prior to contact in the late 15th and 16th centuries, such as religion, language,
and cultural practices and the subsequent impact of that contact.
5.15 Locate and examine accounts of early Spanish, French and British explorations of North America noting major land and water routes, reasons for exploration and the location and impact of exploration and settlement.
5.16 Explain the religious, political, and economic reasons for movement of people from Europe to the Americas, and analyze the multiple perspectives of the interactions between settlers and
American Indians.
5.17 Locate and examine the 13 British colonies that became the United States and identify the early founders, and describe daily life (political, social, and economic organization and structure).
5.18 Explain multiple perspectives and probable causes and effects of events leading to colonial
independence from British Rule.
5.19 Identify and examine the roles and impact of diverse groups of people (e.g. gender roles, social roles, political and economic structures) within the 13 British colonies that became the United States. including individuals who are American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian or Americans of African, Asian, Pacific Island, Chicano, Latino, or Middle Eastern descent, religious groups, and other traditionally marginalized groups (women, people with disabilities, immigrants, refugees, and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender).
5.20 Identify and examine the roles that American Indians had in the development of the United
States.
5.21 Identify issues related to historical events to recognize power, authority, and governance as it relates to systems of oppression and its impact on ethnic and religious groups and other traditionally marginalized groups in the modern era (bias and injustice, discrimination, stereotypes).
5.22 Summarize how different kinds of historical sources are used to explain events in the past.
5.23 Use primary and secondary sources to formulate historical questions and to examine a historical account about an issue of the time.
5.24 Explain why individuals and groups, including ethnic and religious groups, and traditionally
marginalized groups during the same historical period differed in their perspectives of events.

 

7. Social Science Analysis

5.25 Analyze multiple accounts or perspectives of the same event, issue, problem or topic and
describe important similarities and differences.
5.26 Gather, assess, and use information from multiple primary and secondary sources (such as
print, electronic, interviews, speeches, images) to examine an event, issue, or problem through
inquiry and research.
5.27 Identify characteristics of an event, issue, or problem, suggesting possible causes and results.
5.28 Propose a response or solution to an issue or problem, utilizing research, to support the position.
5.29 Use a range of collaborative procedures to make decisions about and act on civic issues or
problems.